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38. Taking the unknown out of hiring a healthcare attorney

With Matt LaMaster

Let's be honest. It’s not everyday that you have to hire an attorney.

It can be an intimidating process filled with new jargon, details, and processes to which you may have never been exposed and it's also super-important to get it right.

Meet our guest

In this episode, we're speaking with Matt LaMaster, a healthcare attorney in Michigan, to discuss the importance of hiring an industry-specific attorney and the specific advantages for dentists and veterinarians.

Prior to forming LaMaster Law, he spent a major part of his career providing services as corporate counsel for a multi-location dental practice. Matt negotiated, structured, and implemented multiple acquisitions and mergers, and negotiated employment contracts for associate dentists during his career as corporate counsel.




In this episode

  • Why hiring an industry-specific attorney is crucial for dentists and veterinarians
  • How healthcare attorneys can assist with important processes like acquisitions, lease negotiations, real estate transactions, and associate agreements
  • Why it's important to start looking for an attorney early in certain processes
  • How attorneys' fees are structured, and what dentists and veterinarians can expect to pay for certain jobs
  • How different states have different rules regarding attorney fees

Episode transcript

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Matt LaMaster
You need to be able to have a conversation with that attorney that you're going to hire and develop a relationship and trust them if you really want them to meet your expectations. They need to be able to know what your expectations are.
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Corey Brown:

Welcome to the Path to Owning, a podcast by Provide, hosted by me, Corey Brown, a marketing leader at Provide with over a decade in the healthcare industry. If you've found us, you're likely an aspiring or established health care practice owner looking for tools and advice to begin your journey or take your practice to new heights. And you're not alone.
So to help you achieve your practice ownership dreams, twice monthly we’ll tap into our unparalleled network of industry experts who will join us on our quest to provide the answers to your most pressing questions. 
Like what you hear? Follow us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever else you listen. Today we are joined by Matt LaMaster. Matt is the founder and principal attorney of the LaMaster Law Firm LLP, a law firm focused on providing legal services to dental professionals and their practices.
Prior to forming LaMaster Law, he spent a major part of his career providing services as corporate counsel for a multi-location dental practice. Matt negotiated, structured and implemented multiple acquisitions and mergers and negotiated employment contracts for associate dentists. During his career as corporate counsel, he also worked for a large law firm where he gained significant experience counseling his clients in business and corporate matters, real estate transactions, construction law, bankruptcy and complex litigation matters.
In addition, Matt most recently served as in-house counsel and compliance officer for a modest technology company that focused on serving the healthcare industry. Matt, welcome to the show today. It's a pleasure to have you.

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Matt LaMaster
Yeah, thanks, Corey. It's a pleasure to be here and an opportunity to, you know, have your listeners take hopefully in some practical advice today. Thank you.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, of course. And on a separate note, Happy New Year. It's the first recording of the New Year for us. So any resolutions you're trying to do this year?

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Matt LaMaster
I wish I could say I have resolutions. They're more goals for me. I do have a few as it relates to my health and reading and just continue to educate myself. I feel like that's always important. So I'm trying to listen to more podcasts, believe it or not, and some audible books.
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Corey Brown:

There you go. Well, in the spirit of education, that's what we try to do on our show. So today we're going over the topic of taking the unknown out of hiring a healthcare attorney. I know you've been on the health care side of the industry for over a decade, specifically with dentists and veterinarians. Can you tell us what drew you to that specific side of practicing law?

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Matt LaMaster
When I started my firm, one of the core values that we had was I really enjoy helping people that help people. And so personally, we find a lot of similarities in the people that we help. So, you know, with the dentists and veterinarians, optometrists, other physicians, there's a similar compassion for helping people I feel like oftentimes. And so they're just really great clients.
And that's one of our core values, you know, helping people that help people. For veterinarians, it's helping people that help people, that also help animals.
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Corey Brown:

And as a health care provider, why would you say it's important to have an industry-specific attorney on your side?

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Matt LaMaster
Honestly, the bottom line is having somebody who has experience in whatever you're looking to do. So if it's a particular legal field, it's important that they have experience in that legal field. And for us, the healthcare industry is important. But, you know, more than that, for us it's even more specific. So if you're looking to buy or sell your practice, somebody should have experience in buying or selling a practice.
And if it's reviewing a lease, they should have experience in reviewing a lease. And if it's buying a piece of real estate, you know, the list goes on. And so it's not so much that we're health care attorneys, it's that we have experience in an individual area. And if somebody is looking to hire an attorney, that's what they should look for, not just the name health care attorney.
They really need to have the experience in that particular area.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, And I would love for you, if you can, to give us any real life examples that come to mind of maybe like what could potentially go wrong if someone chooses to go with, let's say, like a friend or an attorney that doesn't have specialized expertise or maybe even tries to go about things themselves. You have an example that you could share?

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Matt LaMaster
Yeah, maybe for a specific example, it probably helps giving the two ends of the spectrum. So if you're hiring somebody that doesn't have the experience or isn't working in that particular area, what you're going to find is they're either going to do too little or they're going to do too much. And those are equally bad from different perspectives.
Obviously, if they don't do enough, they're going to miss important things, right? So they're going to miss things sometimes legal items. If they don't have that experience in that area, or they might miss even business terms that are normal in a particular industry. So to give you an example, I'm working with a seller. The buyer was asking certain things about accounts receivables in a dental practice and the things they were asking for weren't normal, and we ended up spending a couple of hours trying to negotiate this issue that we knew was normal in the industry and that either cost that buyer time and money with their attorney or it might have honestly kind of eroded some of the goodwill through the negotiation process that we had to go through. 
So that instance is somebody who just doesn't quite have the experience. And then on the flip side is somebody who does too much. The answer is it just costs a lot more typically. Or again, if they're continually trying to just bring up issues that really shouldn't be issues, then again, in these transactions, at least in the acquisition of practices, goodwill is so important… if you're negotiating a lease, maybe not so much, but that's where I see the difference is too little or too much when you help, when you have a friend or a family member.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah. And I think especially in this market, goodwill is one of those things that's super important to maintain between buyer and seller. So I think you're spot on there. You mentioned acquisitions. What are some other common things attorneys like yourself can help dentists and veterinarians with?

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Matt LaMaster
So the main things for us are typically those acquisitions, those lease negotiations, also real estate, because every acquisition typically has a real estate component, whether you're buying it or leasing. Also you're going to have associate agreements, which we oftentimes negotiate. Those are the big areas that we focus on. There are some other health care attorneys and other larger firms that have a focus on compliance, particularly with, you know, let's say, OSHA or HIPAA.
And certainly we've done a lot of that. When I was with the IT company, that was a large focus for us to be, you know, making sure our clients were HIPAA compliant, not a focus that my firm takes a lot as it relates to like bringing on new clients. We'd refer that stuff out to somebody who specializes size in that, that has more experience.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah. And are there any less common situations where having representation would be beneficial, where initially you might think it's not needed?

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Matt LaMaster
You know, with a lot of physicians, the Medicaid, Medicare, that process of going through billing and credentialing, sometimes an attorney is needed for those sorts of things. Or in those types of practices, there's Stark or anti-kickback laws that kind of come into play a little bit more as it relates to referrals. So again, that's probably for a firm that's more focused on specifically physicians, and that's a special area of law that they focus on, not one particular that we focus on.
And honestly, like I said, there's a lot of attorneys out there that are now doing what we do at my firm and for the most part, the areas that I listed are usually the areas of focus. One other that comes to mind also might be, you know, malpractice defense. So if a doctor finds themselves in trouble or also license defense, so they've got a license issue, a lot of times those go hand in hand.
There's also firms that kind of specialize in that.
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Corey Brown:

How common are those type of occurrences, would you say?

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Matt LaMaster
It's not as common as buying or selling a practice?
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, thank goodness.

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Matt LaMaster
It does happen. I mean, unfortunately, you know, in the day and age that we're at now, people are litigious and they just want to find a way. And honestly, there are certain situations where people have been bad. And one comes to mind actually up in I think it was Wisconsin where somebody was drilling on teeth and there was no reason for him to be drilling on teeth.
Well, it's pretty bad situation when he's prosecuted, so.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, yeah. Well, let's look at as an aspiring owner, let's say, you know, I'm thinking about either starting or acquiring my own practice. When does one need to start looking for an industry specific attorney to be on their side during that path of ownership or that transition?

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Matt LaMaster
Yeah, I would say that the earlier the better. That could be a bit self-serving for some attorneys to answer the question that way. And I understand that. The way I explain it to clients when they call me is if they called me and said, Hey, we have a purchase agreement, we just want you to review it. I've really lost a lot of the leverage in the negotiation of some of the important terms from a business perspective.
And so if I'm involved with the letter of intent, which is if we're doing an acquisition, that would be the best place to getting involved at the Letter of Intent stage, then we can talk about those major terms that are going to flow through to the purchase agreement. Right. And we're able to help early on. And really it can be self-serving for some attorneys to say that because they're going to start charging you a lot of money at the letter of intent stage. 
The way we've kind of built our firm… And honestly, I know my colleagues that do this as well… A lot of them aren't heavy on the fees on the front end to the letter of intent, because they do believe in the importance of it and are willing to kind of take a loss at the letter of intent so that it's easier for everybody and it just makes sense.
You know, I would say in a lease negotiation or a real estate transaction, we oftentimes find ourselves being brought in after a letter of intent is signed. You know, it could be better for us to be brought in earlier, but it's not, I would say, as necessary. And then on associate agreements, we review a lot of associate agreements for graduates and people changing jobs.
You know, I'm always happy to hop on a phone call early on and kind of talk about some of the negotiating points again, because it helps kind of structure what the documents are going to look like. It's much harder for me to change anything in a deal. I'm just looking at the legal document and really what I think the value that somebody with the experience that we have is that we can help negotiate the terms so that they're fair and better for a client.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, absolutely. How do you recommend a dentist or veterinarian go about finding an attorney that is good for their specific needs? You mentioned earlier it's kind of all about expertise, not necessarily industry specific. So how do I know I found the right person?

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Matt LaMaster
Yeah, that's a great question. I think trying to find the person is the first question. The second is, are they the right person? And so the best way to find somebody is to ask people who have used somebody and people that know somebody. And so those are your fellow colleagues in the industry or other professionals like a lender, like Provide… the banker knows a lot of people.
A broker will know people and then you have to take those recommendations and really put them through the test. So I wouldn't want somebody to call me and just blindly say, I'm going to use him without really considering whether I'm right. And so the next thing is, is it that the right person, while interviewing me and having a discussion with me or that attorney that you're going to hire is really the next step.
There's really three things when you're hiring an attorney, I think is really important, is be able to know that they know what they're doing. And you may not 100% know that, but probably based on their profile and what other people have told you will identify if they're competent. And this goes with like accountants as well. And really any other professional you're going to work with.
But knowing that they know what they're doing. The second thing is being able have a conversation with them. A lot of attorneys will talk over clients heads and there's, you know, some pretty deep legal items that we have to talk about. And I think if you can, as somebody who's looking to hire an attorney, be able to understand what they're telling you and they can explain it to you in plain English, that's really important.
So I would say that's number two. And then the third one is how much are they going to charge you? Is it reasonable? And based on those three things, you kind of have to make a decision and some of it is that dangerous t word trust, but you got to have a little bit of trust once you make that decision.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah. Matt, we've talked about why working with an attorney that specializes in your industry is important. And when we return, I'd like to break down what one can expect when obtaining representation. And how do you help take the mystery out of what it really costs. More with Matt LaMaster, right after this. 

I'm Corey Brown and this is Provide’s the Path to Owning It podcast.
We're back with Matt LaMaster of the LaMaster Law Firm, to help take the unknowns out of hiring a health care attorney to represent you and your practice. Matt, we got into this a little bit on the first half, but you know, I'd really just like you to illustrate what it's like when you're deciding on ownership. It's likely the first time a doc is going to need to obtain legal representation.
And I think there are some unknowns that are maybe a little scary when it comes to that. Can you break down what one can expect when working with an attorney for the first time and what that process is really like?

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Matt LaMaster
Yeah, it's a big step and I can appreciate that. I always tell people who I interview with or that are calling me, good job because it is scary. It's like making it real. There's this thought that we're bad people and some attorneys are just like probably every industry, but you've got to make the phone call and you got to really go through that interview process.
And so we talked a little bit about what to look for when you're hiring an attorney. And, you know, can they talk to you? Do they know what they're doing? What's the cost? And so as you go through that interview process, really the first thing is you probably going to email or you're going to call the attorney, you're going to schedule a phone call and you should schedule a phone call or an in-person meeting.
A lot of what we do these days is phone calls. You know, Zoom, sure. But you get a chance to talk to them and you have an opportunity to see if you guys are a good fit. And so you ask them those questions about, you know, how do they charge, what do they do, how can they help? What's their experience, those sorts of questions.
And as you go through that, the attorney honestly should be probably interviewing you too, to see if you're a good fit. Unfortunately, some attorneys just take whatever comes at them. I know myself and the colleagues who do what I do, hopefully are doing a good job at making sure that the clients are right fit and you're doing the same thing.
And so once you get through that process, usually the next step is them actually maybe doing a formal consultation, like they actually will send you an engagement letter and you will sign it and you will hire them. And then for whatever the work is, whether you know it’s an associate agreement, buying a practice, starting up a lease or whatever, then they're going to get going on the work, but they should have an engagement letter.
I said they're going to they should have an engagement letter with you. And that's going to really set forth a relationship, at least on a document.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, well, thank you for setting that up. I think that helps our audience understand what that really looks like in the real world. I would think that most providers’ hesitation, other than not knowing what to expect, would be the fear of how much it will cost. Right? So let's just get into that. Can you give us a clue or a range of what one can expect from a financial perspective?
Let's start with acquisitions as an example.

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Matt LaMaster
Absolutely. So I want to preface it with this. Corey, Like a lot of attorneys are so scared to talk about this. You know, we don't want to talk about, my gosh, how much we charge. And I think the reason why is some are unreasonable. And it's like any industry, though, I think, you know, good dentists, good veterinarians, good physicians are hopefully going to be able to walk through what they can expect.

I appreciate that. And so I personally try to treat people like I want to be treated when I go hire somebody. Yeah. And so I will be as transparent as possible because that's the purpose of this podcast, right? So the answer is it depends. And that's what you're going to get regardless of, you know, what I say, it depends.
I want to be able to give some people some parameters so they can take those on very practically. So I would say on an acquisition, if you're buying a practice, you could expect probably to spend anywhere between, I'll say 5 to 10 initially, but some are probably going to be 10 to 15. That's probably what somebody should realistically expect reasonably to spend.
If you take the broad 5 to $15,000 for an acquisition, it does depend and here's a couple of things and that realm of what that you know, how that could change. Yeah, where you are and where your attorney is. So if you're hiring an attorney in Chicago, New York City, L.A., they charge more because that's just the nature of where they are.
But guess what? You as a dentist, veterinarian, whatever, you're going to charge more, too. It's what it is. Yeah, you can expect that to be higher. So also the nature of the transaction. So if you're just buying a practice and you're taking a lease over, assuming the lease, that's typically less work than buying a practice house, hiring the seller, buying the real estate, having the seller loan you money, it's just more so it does depend on those sorts of things.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, well, thank you for clearing that up for us. Let's talk you mentioned lease negotiations. What if somebody is starting their first practice from scratch or doing a new startup or leasing the home of the current practice they're buying from the doctor? What would lease negotiations look like from a financial perspective?

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Matt LaMaster
Yeah, from a startup perspective, you know, we understand that there's only a finite amount of money and they need to get started. And so in those situations we also try to take that into account. But I would say probably on a lease negotiation with a startup, it'll probably be around at the low end 2000, but probably somewhere around 3 to $5000.
And that also gives you some things that that depends on is the length and nature of the lease and how complex, you know, maybe tenant improvement allowance might be. I know you've got, you know, if somebody else is listening to another podcast, I'm sure some people have talked about tenant improvement allowance.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, absolutely.

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Matt LaMaster
So one of the parameters of the lease and so I tell clients this when they interview with me, I say, Yeah, you know, I could get a 12 page lease or I could get a 62 page lease. And so that's going to have a major impact on the cost. The other impact with a lease is going to be, well, who are we dealing with from the landlord side?
Are we talking institutional landlord? Are we talking to mom and pop? What's the landlord like and what's their experience in negotiating?
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, it makes perfect sense. Let's talk about the two other examples we talked about earlier. What about purchasing the real estate?

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Matt LaMaster
So that is also going to depend on the amount of due diligence that somebody does. But I would probably say around $2000 to $5000.
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Corey Brown:

Okay. And associate agreements was the last thing we had mentioned.

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Matt LaMaster
Yeah. So this depends on what side you're on. If you're on an employer side and you want to draft and you have an ongoing business that's making money and the person's going to provide you maybe some sort of like sample that you can use in the future, because that's what a lot of dentists, veterinarians will do. And so.
You know, that might be like 500 to $1000, maybe a little bit more. Again, it depends on how much that associate’s negotiating do on the employee side. It depends on where you're at in your career, maybe in exactly what again, how complex and the things that you're trying to negotiate. But for instance, we do a lot of new grads from Marquette, University of Michigan, Detroit Mercy, and a lot of schools down in Florida.
We're going to work with them. And I always try to give them a discount for those new grads, you know, maybe three, 500 bucks. That's not what everybody would charge. But I would say it's hard to spend more than $1,000 if you're a new grad. Negotiating the associate agreement and I tell them to, you know, this is your first job.
I understand you have a finite amount of money. You probably don't have a couple thousand dollars waiting to spend on an attorney. And you go through that process and sometimes they don't even sign with that employer. So it's like for them to spend hundreds of dollars and then not even sign. Personally, I feel like you need to be able to work with them.
And I do enjoy helping them get through that stage in that process of, you know, getting their first job. It's pretty exciting. I remember those days myself.
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Corey Brown:

No I bet that is.

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Matt LaMaster
And if I could just add one more thing, I think what I would say is when we do an acquisition, each one of these fees that I just mentioned is not separate. So usually when we do the acquisition, we'll do the purchase and the lease negotiations or real estate and, you know, an associate agreement if it's needed, all is one fee and that is the numbers I was giving you like the $5,000 to 10,000.
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Corey Brown:

Well, thank you for being so transparent with the talk of fees. I know that's something our audience has been wanting to kind of get a better feel of. So I appreciate that. Can we talk a little bit? You mentioned how attorneys charge. What's the advantage or I guess, disadvantage of working with an attorney that charges a flat fee versus an hourly rate?

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Matt LaMaster
Those are the main ways that most attorneys will charge in this industry. You know, some people charge contingency fees, which you're not going to really find that you shouldn't. But if you're looking at an hourly or flat rate attorney, again, it really comes back to like what you feel most comfortable with. A lot of clients do like the flat fee because they can budget it, especially the buyers.
They know what they're going to spend. A seller knows that that's what they're going to spend. A good number of my colleagues do flat fees. The hourly you're paying for the amount of time that the attorney spends. And there are really two schools of thought. So a flat fee attorney may say something like, well, an hourly attorney is just going to rack up the time because they get more money.
That would be the cynic saying that about a flat fee attorney. Conversely, an hourly attorney might say, well, if a flat fee attorney's going to get $5,000, why would they spend any extra time? Why would they do X, Y and Z? Why would they find an issue? And so again, you got to go back to trust and you go through that interview process.
And do I feel comfortable with the amount that they're going to charge and the amount that they've quoted? And you just have to have a good sense of that.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah. What do you think pushes one over the edge to get that like sense of trust and make the decision?

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Matt LaMaster
Maybe just a connection with the person that you're talking to? I find that some people, you know, when we interview somebody, there's just an immediate like, okay, yeah, we're on the same page. And for others, even though I tell them maybe what my flat fee is, and sometimes it's even lower than what I think, it's low. They’re just not quite there.
But you know, Corey, actually, I think one of the things that does help me personally and probably my other colleagues is because somebody has referred us in oftentimes they've given our name and sometimes multiple people have given my name. So there's already some built up trust.
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Corey Brown:

Sure.

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Matt LaMaster
Which I think can help in that process. 
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Corey Brown:

I mean, we've talked about that many times on the show about trusting in your fellow peers and looking to others to look for industry partners that might be a good fit for them. So I think you've hit the nail on the head. There are you've mentioned some different states and how there might be different rules. Can you talk about how different states I mean, do they have different rules regarding what or how one can charge?

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Matt LaMaster
For the most part, large scale hourly attorneys will oftentimes take a retainer. The idea there is they're going to typically say, I think I'm going to bill $3,000 or $5,000. So they might take three or $5,000 as a retainer. And so the rules usually will say that if they're going to take a retainer, it's not earned until they earn it by billing the time.
And so a lot of the rules will focus around like what is a retainer? Is it for work that's not been done in some states will allow for payment on work to be performed or again, when you kind of go back to this flat fee, it has nothing to do with the hours I spend. It's just what the flat fee is.
And so that has to be a reasonable though, to like, for instance, I couldn't charge $100,000 probably for me spending one hour on something. But the rules kind of differ. They really do across the states. And a lot of it really focuses on prepayments or is it a retainer? What can you do as it relates to the retainer?
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, and I would imagine those rules are designed probably to protect the health care provider, right?

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Matt LaMaster
They are, Yeah.
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Corey Brown:

Yeah, yeah, for sure. Matt, I know your licensed to practice law in Michigan, Florida and Wisconsin. And for those listening outside of those states, are you still able to assist them in any way on their journey?

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Matt LaMaster
So personally, I had made a decision, unfortunately to say I'm going to put them in the hands of somebody who's licensed in that state. Other attorneys differ. There's ethical rules on what you can do in terms of practicing law outside of a state that you're licensed in. So you have to be licensed to practice law in the state.
Some ways they do that will be they'll get local counsel. So they may have a relationship with like, let's say, an attorney in Texas, and I would utilize that attorney in Texas to still provide help to my client. But the attorney in Texas is also the one that's licensed. My personal feeling on it is I'm fine with that person just hiring the attorney in Texas. Some of my colleagues and my friends are like, well geez, you should just, you know, get as much work as possible. I feel comfortable where I'm at and I enjoy practicing in the states I'm licensed.
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Corey Brown:

It makes perfect sense for those listening that are interested in your services and reside in those states. What's the best way for them to contact you?

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Matt LaMaster
Well, they can come visit me in Michigan… The best way to get a hold of me is by email or phone call. I frankly appreciate having a phone call. And so even when somebody emails me, oftentimes I'm going to say, hey, let's set up a call. I like the dialogue. I feel like email has its place, but we need to be able to talk.
And so you can email me, we're going to end up hopping on a phone call. So if you just call me, that's fine. You know, I take texts, but texts get lost. So many people text me every day and you know, I'll take it. But I'd rather have a phone call my office line. I'll give out my cell phone if you know you're a client.
But my office line is 248-301-0123.
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Corey Brown:

Thank you for that. Matt and I would like for you to leave us with just your best piece of advice for an aspiring or established dentist or veterinarian, when it comes to working with an attorney or hiring the right attorney, what would you suggest to them?

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Matt LaMaster
I think you need to be able to have a relationship with them. I find that when I'm able to have a relationship with my client, the transaction goes better. I feel better about it, but also my client does. So you need to be able to have a conversation with them and develop a relationship and trust them. Understand that time is money for an hourly attorney.
I do understand that. But if you really want them to meet your expectations, they need to be able to know what your expectations are and develop that relationship.
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Corey Brown:

Matt, thank you for helping us take the mystery out of hiring a health care attorney. We admire your openness and willingness to be transparent and your time and expertise is very much appreciated. Thank you.

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Matt LaMaster
Yeah, my pleasure. Thanks for having me. It was a pleasure.
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Corey Brown:

Thanks for joining us. Because you've listened to this whole episode, we assume you're entertained or at the very least, learn something new. If so, leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or Spotify. Have a topic you'd like discussed in a future episode? Drop us a line in the comments section or send us a message on social media. 
If you're ready to take your practice ownership dreams into your own hands, be sure to visit GetProvide.com to pre-qualify and browse our practice marketplace or check out our news page for more helpful resources.
The path to owning it is brought to you by the team at Provide… and it's produced by Podcamp Media, branded podcast production for businesses. PodCampMedia.com. Producer Dusty Weis, editor Emily Kaysinger.
For Provide, I'm Corey Brown. Thanks for being on the journey with us.

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Provide is a division of Fifth Third Bank, National Association. All opinions expressed by the participant are solely their current opinions and do not reflect the opinions of Provide, its affiliates, or Fifth Third Bank. The participant’s opinions are based on information they consider reliable, but neither Provide, its affiliates nor Fifth Third Bank warrant its completeness or accuracy and should not be relied upon as such. This content is for informational purposes and does not constitute the rendering of legal, accounting, tax, or investment advice, or other professional services by Provide or any of its affiliates. Please consult with appropriate professionals related to your individual circumstances. All lending is subject to review and approval.

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